Most of us prefer to keep money at our bank accounts than to keep at home as we believe that banks are safer in comparison to our homes. But, you must get panicked, once you read a blog post by Sijmen Ruwhof, Freelance IT Security Consultant and an Ethical Hacker.
He has published a bank review entitled “How I could hack internet bank accounts of Danish largest bank in a few minutes”  in which he revealed that any hacker could easily get into the website of Danske Bank, one of the largest banks of Denmark, and get access to the users accounts.
His in-depth technical post explains the extent to which Danske Bank is vulnerable to hacking.
He discovered the vulnerability in August when he got intrigued with the idea of testing Bank’s security while interacting with a group of Danish hackers at the Chaos Communication Camp (CCC), near Berlin.
During the interacting program, security experts and Whitehat hackers were disappointed with the terrible security implementations adopted by many Danish Banks.
“I opened up the Danske Bank’s website and was curious to see how the HTML code looked like, so opened the code of the customer login screen of the banking environment. I strolled thru the code to get a grasp of the technology used,” the security researcher wrote in the blog.
Then he saw JavaScript comments that seemed to contain internal server information. Not just a few variables, but quite a lot of confidential data.
“It was in URL encoded format, so I decoded it right away. Really wondering what kind of secrets it contained,” he added. I was shocked. Is this happening for real? In less than a minute on their web site, this is just the HTML code of the login screen, one of the most visited pages of Danske Bank’s web site.”
The researcher said that he could see IP address of a probable customer via variable HTTP_CLIENTIP while visiting Danske Bank’s website. Similarly, HTTP_USER_AGENT contains an operating system and web browser details.
He warned that variable HTTP_COOKIE was visible and full of information; credentials of a customer could be hijacked in a very few time.
According to the researcher, Danske Bank doesn’t use a secure HTTPS connection to transport customer banking traffic; as variable HTTPS was OFF and SERVER_PORT carried value 80. The bank is still using COBOL code on their backend; for (Customer Information Control System) CICS and Database handling.
However, the good news is bank has patched all the vulnerabilities only after the researcher had uploaded his findings on his blog.

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