Space may be the final frontier, but Google is giving us Earthlings a closer look at a place most of us will likely never visit: the International Space Station (ISS). 

The search giant partnered with European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet to capture imagery from inside the ISS for Google Maps' Street View. This wasn't a straightforward process, Pesquet explains in a blog post, and it was made all the more difficult because of zero gravity.

What Pesquet captured are 360-degree images of the inner workings of the ISS that give internet explorers a closer look at where astronauts live and work, as well as a view of our big blue marble from inside the station.

You can get to all of the ISS imagery through this dedicated page, but note to see the Street View captures (such as this dizzying one) you'll need to click the "View on Google Maps" link in the descriptions. These are located on the right-hand side once you select an area of the ISS you want to explore.

Street View is a fantastic way to expand our worldview, and now everyone has the chance to explore the ISS and get a taste of life 250 miles above. 

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